1. Limit your intake of salt and caffeine. (No more than the equivalent of four regular cups of coffee per day.)
  2. Try to get 8 hours of sleep each night.
  3. Have regular check-ups with your physician. Early detection is the key to a successful solution.
  4. Keep a positive attitude and wear a smile… it takes only 22 muscles to smile, but 37 to frown.
  5. Make time for leisure activities such as reading, hobbies, sports, TV etc.

It’s so important to stay on top of healthy food options, especially for your heart but we can also understand that sometimes you might not have the time to cook a healthy meal. This is why according to Dr. David Friedman we have come up with 5 healthy sandwich options that are quick, easy, and delicious to make!

  1. Turkey Sandwich: Turkey contrains less fat and has an abundance of protein. Add some lettuce, mayo, cheese, and a few slices of tomato on delicious brown bread and you’re good to go!
  2. Tuna Sandwich: Tuna contains vitamin B-12 and B-6 which reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, it also contains a high level of protein and fats.
  3. Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato (BLT): This sandwich is not only easy to make but contains a lot of nutrients, although, bacon contains a lot of sodium, try replacing it with Turkey bacon. This is a delicious treat to throw on some whole wheat brown bread!

It’s so important to stay on top of healthy food options, especially for your heart but we can also understand that sometimes you might not have the time to cook a healthy meal. This is why according to Dr. David Friedman we have come up with 5 healthy sandwich options that are quick, easy, and delicious to make!

  1. Turkey Sandwich: Turkey contrains less fat and has an abundance of protein. Add some lettuce, mayo, cheese, and a few slices of tomato on delicious brown bread and you’re good to go!
  2. Tuna Sandwich: Tuna contains vitamin B-12 and B-6 which reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, it also contains a high level of protein and fats.
  3. Bacon, Lettuce, and Tomato (BLT): This sandwich is not only easy to make but contains a lot of nutrients, although, bacon contains a lot of sodium, try replacing it with Turkey bacon. This is a delicious treat to throw on some whole wheat brown bread!

Serves 4

Ingredients

QuantityIngredient
1 lb.Ground Chicken
1/2 cupBreadcrumbs
1/4 cupParmesan cheese, freshly grated
2 tbsp.Fresh parsley, finely chopped
1 tsp.Oregano, dried
1 tsp.Thyme, dried
1/2 tsp.Salt
3-1 litre boxesLow-sodium chicken broth
2-28 fl. oz. cansTomatoes, diced, with juice from cans
8Carrots, diced
5Potatoes, peeled, diced
2Onions, chopped
4 clovesGarlic, chopped
1 tsp.Oregano, dried
2 tsp.Thyme, dried
4 tsp.Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

Instructions

  1. Combine the first 7 ingredients in the list very well.
  2. With moistened hands, form 1″ diameter meatballs (chicken).
  3. In a large soup pot/Dutch oven, bring the broth to a boil.
  4. Drop meatballs into the broth and cook at medium high for 5 minutes.
  5. Add tomatoes, their juice, carrots, potatoes, onions, garlic, oregano and thyme.
  6. Lower heat to medium
  7. Simmer, uncovered, breaking up the tomatoes with the back of a spoon.  Simmer for about 45 minutes until meatballs are cooked through and the vegetables are tender.
  8. Season to taste with pepper and try not to use any salt.
  9. Serve in a deep soup bowl (helps keep it nice and hot) and just before serving, sprinkle a teaspoon of the grated cheese on top of each bowl.

Recipes From Our Resident Expert, Marsha Rosen, RD
Here are some heart healthy recipes provided by Marsha Rosen, RD (Registered Dietitian). Marsha is Mike Salem’s sister and in addition to offering private nutrition counselling, Marsha provides group lectures, seminars and cooking demonstrations, and is a sought-after contributor to health-related publications.

If you have nutrition question for our dietician, you can email Marsha here…

Do you have a heart healthy recipe that you would like to share? Send your recipes to info@mikeynetwork.com

This week’s Fitness Post is brought to you by personal trainer Igor Klibanov from Fitness Solutions Plus.

Are you stretching enough? The truth is that what makes sense for one person may not make sense for another. The same is true with stretching.

If you’ve been to my talk called “exercise for different body types”, you’ll know how our trainers assess our clients to determine whether they should stretch or not.

Whether you should stretch before or after exercise and how is only complicated by the fact that there are 4 different types of stretching:

  1. Static passive. This is the most common form of stretching. Think about putting your leg out and reaching forward. It’s static (meaning that you’re not moving), and it’s passive (meaning that you let an external force, like gravity pull you into position).
  2. Static active. Think about how figure skaters skate with one leg up in the air (doing a standing split). This is static (means they’re not moving), but active (because they’re using their own muscle force to get into position).
  3. Dynamic passive. Think about swinging your leg forward and back. It’s dynamic (meaning the limb is moving), but it’s passive, because you’re letting an external force (in this case, momentum) take you through the range of motion.
  4. Dynamic active. It looks similar to dynamic passive, but it’s done under much more control, in which case you’d be using your own muscle force to move the limb.

I hesitate to make generalizations, since one-size-fits-all isn’t optimal (or can actually injure you), but before exercise, you should do dynamic stretches, and after exercise, static stretches.

There are exceptions to this rule, however. What if you have certain muscles that are tight to begin with? In that case, it makes sense to do static stretching on those muscle both before and after.

Oh, and here’s a side note: just because a muscle feels tight doesn’t mean it is tight, and stretching that muscle will do more damage than good. We look at your range of motion to truly identify if a muscle is tight or not. Often muscles can feel tight because neighboring muscles in the body are weak, so they’re taking the load of the weak muscles.

When we’re working with clients, to determine whether they should stretch, what type of stretching, and how much, here are all the factors that go into our consideration:

  1. Present range of motion of different joints (tighter people will need more stretching. For people who have lax joints, stretching will actually increase their risk of injury).
  2. Demands of daily life. Are we working with a desk-bound employee or a gymnast? The desk-bound employee will require less range of motion than the gymnast.
  3. Previous and current injuries.
  4. Goals. If your goals include improved flexibility, we’ll be stretching you more than if your goals include weight loss.

As you can see, it’s not quite as simple as saying “do these stretches”, and you’ll be healthier for it. Not the case. For some people (we see this especially in women), stretching may create more laxity in already lax joints, and increase risk of injury.